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Christiana has a learning disability and recently graduated from high school thanks to AFC's assistance securing the support she needed to learn.

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AFC in the News

07.14.2013 | New York Daily News | Charter school funding, set by the state, has risen from about $32 million to about $659 million over a decade as the mayor increased their number.... “It’s no secret that this administration has made charter schools a priority, and this can be seen in dollars as well as in the allocation of space,” said Kim Sweet, executive director of city nonprofit Advocates for Children. Read article

06.06.2013 | AM New York | After years of budget cuts and a pronounced narrowing of the curriculum at public schools in New York City and across the nation, leading candidates vying to be the city's next mayor are promoting a vision of our schools that includes a healthy dose of arts and music and expanded access to a rich and engaging curriculum. Our organizations, as part of a coalition of more than 40 arts, education and child welfare groups, asked each of the declared 2013 mayoral candidates to share their ideas for arts in education in public schools. Read article

05.31.2013 | MSNBC | As the national conversation on school safety continues to draw attention, the so-called school-to-prison pipeline has largely gone unmentioned. But a new report finds that tighter disciplinary policies and an increased number of police officers at school are landing a staggering number of children behind bars, instead of behind desks. In recent years, thousands of students have been suspended, expelled, or even arrested for minor infractions, finds the report, Keeping Kids In School and Out of Court, all in the name of making school a safer place. These punitive measures disproportionately target minority and special education students, putting them at a greater risk for dropping out, court involvement, and incarceration. Read article

05.30.2013 | The New York Times | The New York Times Editorial Board endorses the recommendations of the New York City School-Justice Partnership Task Force. The New York State Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children, working with Advocates for Children of New York, sponsored the New York City School-Justice Partnership Task Force with support from the law firm of Skadden Arps and a grant from The Atlantic Philanthropies. Read article

05.30.2013 | GothamSchools | A group of city officials, educators and members of the justice system are determined to make lowering school suspensions and arrests a high city priority. The 45-member School-Justice Partnership task force led by a former state judge released a report Thursday that recommends the next mayor encourage all agencies and the court system to work together to reduce suspensions, summonses and student arrests. The report, which took two years to complete, was presented to an audience of about 150 at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice where mayoral candidate Bill Thompson also made an appearance to support the recommendations. Read article

05.30.2013 | SchoolBook | An influential group of criminal justice and youth experts is urging the next mayor of New York City to reform the way students are disciplined, and dramatically reduce the number of school suspensions and arrests. “Suspension and arrest significantly increase the likelihood of students repeating a grade, dropping out of school entirely and ultimately facing the court system,” said Judge Judith Kaye, former chief judge for New York. Last year in New York City, nearly 900 students were arrested at school and nearly 70,000 students were suspended. Kaye convened a 45-member task force in 2011 to examine the issue. On Thursday it released the report called Keeping Kids In School and Out of Court. Read article

05.30.2013 | NY1 | The Road to City Hall's Errol Louis sat down with the members of the New York City School-Justice Partnership Task Force, including the state's former Chief Judge Judith Kaye, who chaired the group; Kathleen DeCataldo, the Executive Director of the state's Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children; and Kim Sweet, who is the Executive Director of Advocates for Children of New York, about their new report, which criticizes the city's policy on student suspensions. Watch video

05.01.2013 | New York Family | As the granddaughter, daughter, and sister of teachers, Kim Sweet broke the mold by studying law. But it seems that the education bug never left her blood. As the executive director of Advocates for Children of New York (AFC), Sweet has made a career out of helping city students get a quality education that meets their needs. Read article

05.01.2013 | Leanin.org | AFC's Ana Espada shares her personal triumph in an article featured oo LeanIn.org.  Ana states, "As a child, I knew right away that I was different. I was born in the mid-1950s, the youngest of four overachieving sisters. I was rebellious, messy and temperamental, fighting with my parents when they tried to dress all of us in matching crinoline dresses. I was clearly not a girly-girl and I didn’t even know if I was a girl in my heart. I just knew that I wasn’t like my sisters, who were all feminine, cutesy and smart." Read the entire article here.

04.08.2013 | WABC-TV Eyewitness News | Art McFarland reports on the complaint filed by AFC against the NYC Department of Education for its failure to provide students with disabilities necessary behavioral supports as mandated by law. "The schools were not providing the appropriate behavioral supports," Rebecca Shore said. Shore is an attorney for Advocates for Children, which has filed the complaint. The group points out that as student suspensions for last school year totaled 69,643. Disabled students suspended made up more than 32 per cent of that number, even though disabled students are only 12 per cent of the citywide student population. Read article