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Statement by AFC in Response to the Release of NYC’s Grades 3-8 English Language Arts & Math Test Scores

08.12.2015 | The English Language Arts (ELA) and Math state test scores released today once again show tremendous discrepancies between the performance of New York City students in general education and the performance of students who have disabilities or are English Language Learners (ELLs). While the overall numbers of students in grades 3—8 demonstrating proficiency have increased slightly in both English Language Arts and Math, we note several disturbing points:

  • Proficiency rates for ELLs are devastating, with only 4.4% achieving proficiency in English Language Arts and less than 15% achieving proficiency in Math. 
  • The percentage of students with disabilities scoring at or above proficient on the exams is equally distressing, improving a negligible amount in English Language Arts (increasing from 6.7% last year to 6.9% this year) and actually declining (from 11.4% to 11.3%) in Math. 
  • The size of the gap between both ELLs and students with disabilities and their peers in general education grew this year. This is unacceptable. 

Advocates for Children of New York (AFC) has called repeatedly for the New York City Department of Education (DOE) to address these gaps. The DOE needs to immediately develop and share a plan for improving proficiency rates for students with special education needs through use of evidence-based teaching methodologies as well as increased use of assistive technology, which can allow students who may not learn through traditional means to access the curriculum. Additionally, the DOE needs to develop a plan to ensure that all schools are providing ELLs with high-quality instruction so that they are able to acquire sufficient knowledge of the English language in order to access the general education curriculum. Furthermore, ELLs who are enrolled in bilingual education programs should be offered Native Language Arts assessments, which more accurately reflect their growth than ELA assessments, and ELLs who have arrived within the past two years should be exempt from participating in ELA assessments as they receive instruction focused on mastering English as a new language. View statement as pdf